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Deck Building Tools: What You'll Need

Updated: Apr 15

What tools would you need if you decide to build your own deck? A handyman already has many of the tools needed to build a deck, which is fantastic news! They are inexpensive and worth investing in, especially if you only want to use them on your deck. Renting power tools instead of buying can save you money. Deck tools can be divided into five categories: planning and measurement tools, general carpentry and digging tools, cutting tools, fastening tools, and finishing tools.

Deck Building Tools: What You'll Need

Layout and Measurement Tools

To construct a high-quality deck, you will need to examine it on a regular basis to ensure that its components are level, plumb, and square. The deck tools and equipment listed below will assist you with precision and other aspects of your construction.

Tape Measures and Chalk Lines

A 25-foot tape measure is usually sufficient, although a larger tape measure may be necessary for a large deck. Chalk lines (or chalk boxes) are used to quickly and precisely create straight lines. Also, use easily erased blue chalk to save future headaches (red chalk, on the other hand, is fairly permanent).

Squares for Framing and Speed

Deck framing and speed squares are essential tools. This tool is used to check the squareness of corners and mark long straight lines. Speed squares are frequently used to mark boards for cutting. Small objects require a torpedo level, whereas larger items require two- and four-foot levelling rods.

Excavation and General-Use Equipment:

Hand tools are generally sufficient for excavating; however, for particularly large operations, you may want to employ a landscaper or rent an earth-moving or post hole-digging machine.


Shovels

Digging is required to build a deck, and the following tools are required. A spade shovel is used to dig up soil. Mark the digging areas using a mason's line. The drain spade's small blades make shallow posthole digging easier. A clamshell post hole digger is suitable for deeper post holes.

Pipe and Squeeze Clamps

While you are driving fasteners, you can use a variety of clamps to hold components in place temporarily. The length of a pipe clamp is equal to the length of the pipe to which the two sections are attached. Unlike the squeezing clamp, which grabs rapidly, the sliding clamp holds more solidly in place.

Pry Bars and Wrenches

While you are driving fasteners, you can use a variety of clamps to hold components in place temporarily. The length of a pipe clamp is equal to the length of the pipe to which the two sections are attached. Unlike the squeezing clamp, which grabs rapidly, the sliding clamp holds more solidly in place.


Read more: Anatomy of a Deck

Tools for Cutting

Although deck construction does not necessitate cuts as precise as those required for cabinetry, the accuracy of your cuts should be excellent.

Circular Saw

A circular saw is frequently used for the majority of cuts, making it the greatest tool for deck construction. Purchase a saw that cuts consistently and equip it with a sharp carbide-tipped blade to maximize your productivity.

Jigsaw

For curved cuts and cutting in tight spaces, a jigsaw, also known as a sabre saw, should be used, and an oscillating saw for even tighter spaces should be used.

Reciprocating Saw

A reciprocating saw is required for demolition and is also useful for finishing cuts on 6x6 posts. However, a hand saw can be used in place of a reciprocating saw in some situations.

Knives and Shears

Always keep a utility knife and a couple of wood chisels handy for finishing and slightly modifying cuts on the job. Tin snips, commonly referred to as aviator shears, are used to cut metal and plastic flashing materials. A tiny plane that has been properly calibrated shaves boards with ease and efficiency. It is possible that you will use a grinder from time to time to chop away metal or stone.

Table Saw

A compact table saw like this, often known as a jobsite saw, rips boards to the desired width quickly and efficiently.

Chop Saw

A power mitre saw, sometimes known as a chop saw, is a tool that creates precise crosscuts with ease.

Tools for Fastening

A power nailer is far faster and easier to use than a hammer, and it eliminates denting caused by mishits when hand nailing. Nonetheless, a hammer is frequently employed to drive joist-hanger nails and to get access to confined locations. When nailing, a nail set extends your reach. A teco nailer, like a power nailer, can be used to drive small nails for joist hangers and other fasteners.

A cordless drill with an 18- or 20-volt battery has become one of the most popular fastening equipment. An impact driver enables you to drive screws and bolts very hard, and if you're installing decking using face screws, consider using a speed driver. This tool contains a clip that you can load with screws to quickly drive a large number of them, as well as an extender that enables you to work while standing.

Nail Gun and Compressor

Though professionals frequently use larger compressors, an unit like this with 150 PSI and 6 gallons of air provides more than enough force for deck construction.

Tools for Shaping and Smoothing

Use a round over or decorative bit on a router to round over rough edges and create unique designs. This is the most powerful sanding tool available, however it should be used with care to avoid damaging wood. A random orbit sander does the same job but is more user-friendly. A hand sander could also be used to finish the job.


Now that you understand the tools you require for a successful DIY deck building project, you should head on to our free deck design tool to unleash your creativity.


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